Articles | Volume 7, issue 1
J. Bone Joint Infect., 7, 1–9, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/jbji-7-1-2022
J. Bone Joint Infect., 7, 1–9, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/jbji-7-1-2022
Original full-length article
06 Jan 2022
Original full-length article | 06 Jan 2022

Nuclear imaging does not have clear added value in patients with low a priori chance of periprosthetic joint infection. A retrospective single-center experience

Karsten D. Ottink et al.

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Short summary
A low-grade periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) may be difficult to diagnose, and nuclear imaging could help in the diagnosis. However, its diagnostic value is unclear. We retrospectively evaluated this diagnostic value. We conclude that in patients presenting with nonspecific symptoms and a low a priori chance of PJI based on clinical evaluation, nuclear imaging is of no clear added value in diagnosing a PJI.