Journal cover Journal topic
Journal of Bone and Joint Infection An open-access journal of the European Bone and Joint Infection Society and the MusculoSkeletal Infection Society
Journal topic

Journal metrics

h5-index value: 15
h5-index15
Volume 4, issue 6
J. Bone Joint Infect., 4, 285–291, 2019
https://doi.org/10.7150/jbji.35683
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
J. Bone Joint Infect., 4, 285–291, 2019
https://doi.org/10.7150/jbji.35683
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Original full-length article 07 Nov 2019

Original full-length article | 07 Nov 2019

A population-based study on the treatment and outcome of enterococcal prosthetic joint infections. A consecutive series of 55 cases

Olof Thompson1, Magnus Rasmussen1, Anna Stefánsdóttir2, Bertil Christensson1, and Per Åkesson1 Olof Thompson et al.
  • 1Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Division of Infection Medicine and Skåne University Hospital, Department of Infectious Diseases, Lund, Sweden;
  • 2Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Division of Orthopedics and Skåne University Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Lund, Sweden.

Keywords: prosthetic joint infection, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, debridement, outcome, treatment

Abstract. AIM: Enterococci cause 2-11% of all prosthetic joint infections (PJI) and are generally considered difficult to treat. However, study-results are not consistent. In this study we present a population-based case series of 55 cases with enterococcal PJI, investigating treatment and outcome, as well as describing the affected patient population regarding demography and co-morbidities.

METHODS: We identified all enterococcal PJIs in the Region of Skåne, Sweden, during a five-year period (2011-2015) and reviewed the patients' medical records.

RESULTS: Fifty-five enterococcal PJIs were found. Enterococcus faecalis was the most frequently isolated species (84%), and poly-microbial infections were common (64%). Treatment with intention to cure was given to 43 (78%) cases. Debridement with retention of the implant and antibiotics (DAIR) was the most common surgical treatment strategy (71%), with a cure-rate of 72%. Overall cure-rate was 67%, and in cases where cure was intended, this was achieved in 80%.

CONCLUSIONS: When cure is aimed for, the prognosis for enterococcal PJI is not so poor, and DAIR treatment can provide adequate results in many cases.

Publications Copernicus
Download
Citation