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Journal of Bone and Joint Infection An open-access journal of the European Bone and Joint Infection Society and the MusculoSkeletal Infection Society
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Volume 3, issue 3
J. Bone Joint Infect., 3, 150–155, 2018
https://doi.org/10.7150/jbji.21846
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
J. Bone Joint Infect., 3, 150–155, 2018
https://doi.org/10.7150/jbji.21846
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Original full-length article 27 Jul 2018

Original full-length article | 27 Jul 2018

Analysis Of The KLIC-score; An Outcome Predictor Tool For Prosthetic Joint Infections Treated With Debridement, Antibiotics And Implant Retention

Sean DX Duffy, Nathanael Ahearn, Elizabeth SR Darley, Andrew J Porteous, James R Murray, and Nicholas R Howells Sean DX Duffy et al.
  • Avon Orthopaedic Centre, Southmead Hospital, Bristol

Keywords: Prosthetic, Joint, Infection, Outcome, KLIC, Tool, DAIR

Abstract. Background: Debridement, antibiotics and implant retention (DAIR) forms the primary treatment modality for early prosthetic joint infection (PJI). The KLIC score has been proposed as a risk stratification tool for use in predicting outcome of prosthetic knee infections. Our aim was to determine the accuracy of this scoring system at an independent tertiary PJI centre in a typical DAIR population.

Methods: Between 2008 and 2015, patients with infected knee prostheses treated with DAIR were identified. The patient notes and blood tests were reviewed retrospectively and the 'KLIC-score' was calculated and correlated with outcome. The end point for early failure was defined as: 1) the need for unscheduled surgery, 2) infection-related death ≤12 months from debridement or 3) the need for suppressive antibiotic treatment.

Results: 59 patients received DAIR procedures for knee PJI. Treatment was successful in 41 patients (69%) with early failure in 18 patients (31%). Patients deemed high-risk (KLIC-score ≥7) had notably higher failure rates (60%) than those scoring <7 (28%). No relationship can be drawn between KLIC-scores of <7 and failure rates.

Conclusions: The KLIC-score applied retrospectively was able to predict patients with the highest risk of early failure but provides little information in patients with scores of <7.

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