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Journal of Bone and Joint Infection An open-access journal of the European Bone and Joint Infection Society and the MusculoSkeletal Infection Society
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Volume 2, issue 3
J. Bone Joint Infect., 2, 122–126, 2017
https://doi.org/10.7150/jbji.17129
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
J. Bone Joint Infect., 2, 122–126, 2017
https://doi.org/10.7150/jbji.17129
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Original full-length article 19 Mar 2017

Original full-length article | 19 Mar 2017

Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics of Bacteroides Prosthetic Joint Infections

Neel Shah1, Douglas Osmon1, Aaron J. Tande1, James Steckelberg1, Rafael Sierra2, Randall Walker1, and Elie F. Berbari1 Neel Shah et al.
  • 1Division of Infectious Disease, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA;
  • 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Keywords: Bacteroides, prosthetic joint infection

Abstract. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients with Bacteroides prosthetic joint infection (PJI) have not been well described in the literature. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess the outcome of patients with Bacteroides PJI and to review risk factors associated with failure of therapy. Between 1/1969 and 12/2012, 20 episodes of Bacteroides PJI in 17 patients were identified at our institution. The mean age of the patients in this cohort at the time of diagnosis was 55.6 years; 59% (n=10) had knee involvement. Twenty four percent (n=4) had diabetes mellitus, and 24% had a history of either gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) pathology prior to the diagnosis of PJI. Thirty five percent (n=6) were immunosuppressed. The initial medical/surgical strategy was resection arthroplasty (n=9, 50%) or debridement and implant retention (n=5, 28%). Thirty seven percent (n=7) were treated with metronidazole. Eighty percent (n=4) of patients that failed therapy had undergone debridement and retention of their prosthesis, as compared to none of those treated with resection arthroplasty. Seventy percent (n=14) of patient episodes were infection free at their last date of follow up. In conclusion, a significant proportion of patients with Bacteroides PJI are immunosuppressed and have an underlying GI or GU tract pathology. Retention and debridement of the prosthesis is associated with a higher risk of treatment failure.

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